THE HONEY BEE, POWERHOUSE OF AGRICULTURAL LIFE AND PROVIDER OF EVERYTHING WE EAT.

Modern agricultural practises are destroying the bee. Day by day, the biological diversity that underpins our food systems is disappearing – putting the future of our food, our livelihood, health and environment under severe threat.

Bees and other pollinating insects, play a crucial role in biodiversity and agriculture. They form an integral part of our food system, pollinating crops that end up as food on our dinner tables.

Without bees, a large number of wild and cultivated plant species would no longer exist. For example, the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) estimates

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Did you know that 71 out of some 100 crop species that provide 90% of food worldwide are bee-pollinated! Practically everything we eat has been touched by a bee at some point along the food chain.

We work actively to raise awareness of the dramatic decline of bee populations, and also for an end to the use of harmful pesticides and biodiversity destruction associated with this decline.

Our local beekeeper Giovanni Mari has been keeping bees all his life and so has his family and their family before. Without his work, our food would simply disappear. 

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FILLING UP THE JARS AND LABELING LOCAL HONEY

CHECKING THE DEVELOPMENT OF HONEY COMB AND THE HANDS OF THE MASTER GIOVANNI MARI REGNANO LE MARCHE

LOCAL WALNUT HONEY, DARK, RICH AND OH SO....

Joining the European Citizens’ Initiative “Save bees and farmers”, and commit to enforcing sustainable-bee friendly agriculture throughout Europe.


The European Citizens’ Initiative, led by PAN Europe, calls on the European Commission to introduce legal proposals to:

Phase out synthetic pesticides by 2035: Phase out synthetic pesticides in EU agriculture by 80% by 2030, starting with the most hazardous, to become 100% free of synthetic pesticides by 2035

Restore biodiversity: Restore natural ecosystems in agricultural areas so that farming becomes a vector of biodiversity recovery.

Support farmers in the transition: Reform agriculture by prioritising small scale, diverse and sustainable farming. Supporting a rapid increase in agroecological and organic practices, and enabling independent farmer-based training and research into pesticide and GMO-free farming